Tuesday, February 23, 2010

Is the net half empty or half full?

With Martin Brodeur, it seemed thatthe net was at least half empty, if not more. This was the most attention I've paid to a hockey game since the Leafs lost the 1999 Eastern Conference final. Brodeur has been one of the best at what he does since before I had even heard of hockey, but his age sure showed tonight. He was old, slow, made mistakes in handling the puck and generally seemed to move with the tragedy of a wounded hero.

His American counterpart stopped an astonishing 42 of 45 shots, which reminded me of the Leafs' futility against Dominik Hasek all those years ago. That was when I gave up any attempts at trying to understand hockey. I gave up caring about baseball about five years ago, which leaves only track and football.

For a long time, I found hockey impossible to watch. It was chaotic and no matter how much I wanted to watch a Canadian team in the Stanley Cup, it was dull and I tuned out. Last night, even the futility of the Canadian offense seemed interesting. I'm not sure why, but I attribute it to having been in the presence of a classroom full of kids. Finding the right kid, at times, is not like finding a needle in a haystack, but a puck in front of a crowded net.

As for Team Canada, they now have to beat Germany to get to Russia in the quarterfinal, which is supposedly a big blow. However, odds are that Canada was going to have to play a team like Russia anyway. The match-up happens sooner rather than later because Canada will enter the quarterfinals as a lowly-ranked team. If this team is good enough, it will beat Russia and then play a somewhat weaker opponent later on. Of course, it would have been nice if someone else could knock out Russia, but if it helps, they can pretend that Russia played badly and entered the quarterfinal in a bad position.

11 comments:

Shan said...

When you write about hockey, I double check that this is really your blog.

Brodeur giving away the puck was a costly, dumb move and the US knew they might be able to take advantage of this by overloading the left side. However, I think I was more bothered by his swimming trying to stop the puck. He used to stay on his feet longer and cut down angles. His whole game has deteriorated. I was never a fan of Brodeur, but he's taking so much blame for this and everyone is commenting on his age, but really that could've been predicted beforehand. Hopefully Luongo will be sharp.

And although Germany doesn't have the skill and even lost to Belarus, I am predicting a 3-2 upset with Marco Sturm scoring a pair.

Adeel said...

Yikes, I know you're from Montreal, but try to have some love for Canada.

andré said...

LUONGO? MORE LIKE "WILL BEAT THE GERMANS ARE YOU KIDDING-O". Shan, when predicting games it's usually dangerous to try and be too cute.

Although, in the off chance what you've predicted actually happens, I will be in awe, and also frightened.

Adeel said...

Yeah, why not predict the times of the goal, down to the second?

Shan said...

When a ridiculous upset happens, there's always that one guy who says he predicted it and then no one believes him.

Tomorrow... I WILL BE THAT GUY.

Adeel said...

Unless you're not.

Shan said...

Yeah, probably not.

Jennifer said...

When you write about hockey, I double check that this is really your blog.

That's classic, Shan.

I decided I like commenting in Facebook better because it doesn't ask me for all this extra stuff at the bottom; but then we have two different conversations going.

andré said...

I hope Marco Sturm trips and blows an ankle on his way to pick up some bratwurst this afternoon.

Shan said...

Damn it, I have a ball hockey game at 9 today. Hopefully I'll be back in time for the shootout.

Adeel said...

Dumbass.